A 3D-printed prosthetic that is capable of providing “tactile feedback for a low cost.”

Lorenzo Spreafico — a design student at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom — has embarked on his final project that entails a 3D-printed prosthetic that is capable of providing “tactile feedback for a low cost.”

The ‘T1’ boasts a plastic arm silhouette with “vibrotactile feedback” that has the ability to “relay information about how firmly a person is gripping or touching an object via vibrations to their skin.”

This is a highly innovative and desirable approach to 3D-printed prosthetics.

For one, it gives users a sense of touch.

Secondly, it is a quality that has not been widely adopted either — Lorenzo Spreafico referenced his research that revealed that touch-base technologies were ” either nonviable for commercial use or were destined to be prohibitively expensive.”

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